Climate Change 101: Dataset Reanalysis

Reanalysis mathematically blends together all the products from multiple observing systems and then assimilates them. This process includes algorithms for quality control of the raw satellite data, as well as space and time interpolation schemes and a global operational forecasting model. The assimilation system then removes artificial trends introduced by the updates. Afterall, more is …

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Climate Change 101: Instrumentation

If the first discussion on climate services and their inhomogeneities didn't scare you enough, let me just throw this out there: The U.S. measures surface observations at 1.5 meters above the ground while the rest of the world measures at 2 meters above. **USA! USA!  O.k., o.k., but let's talk about specifics. You've also hopefully …

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Climate Change 101: U.S. Observation Networks

There are two primary networks for surface observations in the United States. The Cooperative Observer Program (COOP) Established in 1890, the COOP is the largest and oldest official network in the U.S. with 11,000 volunteers recording and submitting observations across the country. Instruments are provided by the National Weather Service. Records include max/min temperature, liquid …

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Climate Change 101: Observing the climate itself

Roughly since the early 1800's, people have recorded and transcribed weather observations. Since then, new instruments and methods have entered the science, as well as the idea of climate change itself. We went from measuring short-term weather to long-term climate variations. So how can we justify when the climate is changing?  As a refresher, remember …

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